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On The Concept Of A Book For Someone Who Doesn’t Like Reading: An Argument Against

A photograph of a copy of Jane Eyre with a lock and chain around it

The photograph above was taken by Joanna Paterson.

I don’t remember ever feeling particularly against the idea of ‘a book for someone who doesn’t like reading’ – to use the phrase that first gave me this post idea, but thinking about it recently, I was a bit ill at ease, and although I’m still to make up my mind on the whole thing, I wanted to explore it from this angle of unease.

There are of course good goals to be found in getting non-readers to read, goals such as having children read more, which leads both to their own enjoyment in a new hobby and inevitable education benefits. There’s also the occasional – I’m guessing here, as I’ve not seen it happen – adult convert to reading, as well as people who fear reading for various reasons but might take it up with support.

But the idea itself, of getting someone who doesn’t like reading to do so seems a bit passive aggressive, a bit manipulative. We all have our interests and passions and I don’t think there’s ever an age at which we’re not susceptible to becoming a preacher of something we love, something that another may not feel similarly for. But, or especially in this case, if the person is an adult, you have to respect their interests are different.

I’d say that if someone says categorically that they don’t like reading, you’re not going to find a book for them unless, perhaps, they like the idea of picture books and graphic novels that have few or no words. (If you give them a graphic novel you might be putting in place the pieces for an argument when they tell you yet again.)

An argument in favour of the idea of a book for someone who dislikes them, is the similar idea, ‘if you don’t like to read you haven’t found the right book’, to which I expect the person who is looking for an answer to the initial question would respond ‘bingo!’. (We probably don’t want to get these two people together with the non-reader.)

We could consider the idea of ‘the right book’ strange, because it surely infers that there is one, or just a handful… so what do you do after that? It of course depends on what a person doesn’t like about reading but if by chance they find the metaphorical unicorn, what happens next? Are they now a reader, with one book behind them and no more on the horizon? And is there one or a few books that could really suit everyone?

I love finding or suggesting books for/to people who like a particular genre, or just books in general, but I’m yet to come across anyone who doesn’t like reading be open to the idea. It’s like ‘a car for someone who doesn’t like driving’ or ‘a mountain for someone who doesn’t like hiking’ – nowhere near as extreme, but it shares the same basic premise.

I love books and reading, but there are lots of things I don’t like that others do like, and even if reading is linked to health and education and betterment and many other hobbies aren’t, it still shouldn’t be forced. (And most other hobbies are linked to betterment by their hobbyists, anyway, as would be expected of those with different personalities.)

What do you think of the concept and do you have any anecdotes on the subject?

 
 

Jeanne

October 10, 2018, 9:26 pm

I don’t know anyone who doesn’t like reading. Seriously. I guess that’s the ivory tower.

MaryR

October 10, 2018, 10:44 pm

I think the question of why the person “doesn’t like reading” seems key. If the experience of doing it is unpleasant to them, or they think it is not worth their time, there probably isn’t much to be done–especially if they are an adult. But if it is a matter of finding the right books (and I think there are always many good matches for any reader once you figure out the formula for that person) that is something a non-reader can be helped with. Professional librarians have skills in this area and are a great resource. Bookstore staff are often excellent as well. It is an interesting question to consider.

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